MLB News, Views, Stats, and Notes

November 10, 2021 Morning Edition: Red Sox News Roundup

This is your Red Sox Stats, News, Rumors, and Commentary Roundup for the Morning of November 10, 2021.

A Look at Red Sox Pitchers’ Vertical Movement on Pitches

Ryan Brasier

  • He features a Four Seam Fastball that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to 8.2 inches of vertical movement.
  • He does not feature a changeup in his arsenal of pitches.

  • He features a curveball that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to -6.5 inches.
  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his slider than most pitchers as his vertical movement is -0.7 inches.
  • Garrett Whitlock

  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his Four Seam Fastball than most pitchers as his vertical movement is 7.5 inches.
  • He tends to get more sink on his changeup than most pitchers as his vertical movement is 0.5 inches.
  • He does not feature a curveball or he does not throw it enough to qualify.
  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his slider than most pitchers as his vertical movement is -0.9 inches.
  • Hirokazu Sawamura

  • He features a Four Seam Fastball that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to 8.4 inches of vertical movement.
  • He does not feature a changeup in his arsenal of pitches.

  • He does not feature a curveball or he does not throw it enough to qualify.
  • He features a slider that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to 2.1 inches of vertical movement.
  • Chris Sale

  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his Four Seam Fastball than most pitchers as his vertical movement is 6.0 inches.
  • He tends to get more sink on his changeup than most pitchers as his vertical movement is -0.2 inches.
  • He does not feature a curveball or he does not throw it enough to qualify.
  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his slider than most pitchers as his vertical movement is -4.0 inches.
  • Darwinzon Hernandez

  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his Four Seam Fastball than most pitchers as his vertical movement is 6.5 inches.
  • He does not feature a changeup in his arsenal of pitches.

  • He features a curveball that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to -6.3 inches.
  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his slider than most pitchers as his vertical movement is -1.3 inches.
  • Josh Taylor

  • He features a Four Seam Fastball that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to 8.1 inches of vertical movement.
  • He does not feature a changeup in his arsenal of pitches.

  • He features a curveball that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to -3.4 inches.
  • He features a slider that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to 1.2 inches of vertical movement.
  • Tanner Houck

  • His Four Seam Fastball has considerably more drop to it with its average vertical movement of 3.6 inches.
  • He does not feature a changeup in his arsenal of pitches.

  • He does not feature a curveball or he does not throw it enough to qualify.
  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his slider than most pitchers as his vertical movement is -0.7 inches.
  • Nathan Eovaldi

  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his Four Seam Fastball than most pitchers as his vertical movement is 7.3 inches.
  • He does not feature a changeup in his arsenal of pitches.

  • He tends to get more drop on his curveball (this is desired especially with the 12-to-6 curveball) than most pitchers as his vertical movement is -7.6 inches.
  • He features a slider that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to 0.0 inches of vertical movement.
  • Matt Barnes

  • He features a Four Seam Fastball that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to 9.0 inches of vertical movement.
  • He features a changeup that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it is 3.1 inches.
  • He features a curveball that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to -7.0 inches.
  • He does not feature a slider.
  • Adam Ottavino

  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his Four Seam Fastball than most pitchers as his vertical movement is 7.3 inches.
  • He tends to get more sink on his changeup than most pitchers as his vertical movement is 0.2 inches.
  • He features a curveball that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to -6.4 inches.
  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his slider than most pitchers as his vertical movement is -1.8 inches.
  • Hansel Robles

  • He features a Four Seam Fastball that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to 8.5 inches of vertical movement.
  • He features a changeup that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it is 3.4 inches.
  • He does not feature a curveball or he does not throw it enough to qualify.
  • He features a slider that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to 1.9 inches of vertical movement.
  • Nick Pivetta

  • He features a Four Seam Fastball that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to 10.3 inches of vertical movement.
  • He features a changeup that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it is 5.2 inches.
  • His curveball has an impressive amount of drop to it with its average vertical movement of -12.6 inches.
  • He features a slider that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to -0.2 inches of vertical movement.
  • Martin Perez

  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his Four Seam Fastball than most pitchers as his vertical movement is 7.9 inches.
  • He features a changeup that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it is 4.1 inches.
  • He features a curveball that is located and moves higher in the strike zone than most pitchers, it averages out to -4.5 inches.
  • He does not feature a slider.
  • Eduardo Rodriguez

  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his Four Seam Fastball than most pitchers as his vertical movement is 7.4 inches.
  • He tends to get more sink on his changeup than most pitchers as his vertical movement is 2.4 inches.
  • He does not feature a curveball or he does not throw it enough to qualify.
  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his slider than most pitchers as his vertical movement is -3.5 inches.
  • Garrett Richards

  • His Four Seam Fastball has considerably more drop to it with its average vertical movement of 4.0 inches.
  • He tends to get more sink on his changeup than most pitchers as his vertical movement is 2.0 inches.
  • His curveball has an impressive amount of drop to it with its average vertical movement of -13.2 inches.
  • He tends to get more relative sink and lower pitch placement on his slider than most pitchers as his vertical movement is -2.4 inches.

  • Now onto the News, Rumors, and Commentary…

    “The Red Sox are among the teams to have scouted NPB star Seiya Suzuki, reports Rob Bradford of WEEI. They’re certainly not alone in that regard, as the Hiroshima Carp outfielder has long been regarded as one of the top talents in Japan. The Carp will make Suzuki available to major league clubs this winter via the…”

    Above is the summary of: Red Sox Among Teams To Have Done Due Diligence On Seiya Suzuki… tap or click to check out the full article.

    “Finishing off on a high note, let’s look at the last stretch of Martinez’s season where he continued to impress the Fenway Faithful: September 15-Oct 4: Fangraphs Amassing eight RBI and an above-average .364 wOBA, Martinez led Boston through a rough stretch of games in order to secure a playoff berth. April 1-15: Fangraphs Martinez begins the year with a 16-game stretch posting an insane 241 wRC+— a mark 2.4 times higher than the league average. Martinez finally came back to earth in the first few weeks of April, but this did not stop him from having what was overall a strong season. After a blazing hot April, Martinez seemed prime to rebound from his odd 2020 season.”

    Above is the summary of: A closer looks at the ups and downs of J.D. Martinez’s 2021… tap or click to check out the full article.

    “But the Red Sox still got some excitement at the plate. Rumor Roundup There wasn’t much going on in baseball on Tuesday in terms of actual news, but there were a few rumors worth noting that we will run through quickly, starting with one of the best starting pitchers on the market. But as a Red Sox fan, more teams being willing to go for top-tier players is not a bad thing. And finally, the Rangers have been one of the worst teams in baseball for the last few years, but they appear ready to add payroll this winter.”

    Above is the summary of: MLB Roundup 11/10: Rumor roundup… tap or click to check out the full article.

    “Considering how good Xander Bogaerts is, I’m sure the Red Sox would prefer to have a bit more certainty about his future with the team beyond 2022. (John Tomase; NBC Sports Boston) There are a ton of free agents the Red Sox will look into this offseason, but Seiya Suzuki of the NPB in Japan is someone with whom you may not be familiar. (Chad Jennings; The Athletic) Chaim Bloom wasn’t expecting Tim Hyers to walk away from the Red Sox. (Christopher Smith; MassLive) Chad Jennings took a look at how the Red Sox’s 40-man roster has been reshuffled.”

    Above is the summary of: Daily Red Sox Links: Xander Bogaerts, Tanner Houck, Garrett Whitlock… tap or click to check out the full article.

    ““I think we’ll see how the offseason unfolds,” Bloom said. “Obviously, we have to be mindful of what that fit would look like, and knowing that we have J.D. Martinez and Kyle Schwarber can’t fit in the same Boston lineup for a full season? Certainly not chief baseball officer Chaim Bloom, who remains hopeful that the Red Sox can re-sign Schwarber. as a force in our lineup who is a primary DH, that obviously means something for how the roster comes together and the different possibilities we look at,” Bloom said.”

    Above is the summary of: Schwarber back to Boston? Bloom sees a fit… tap or click to check out the full article.



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