MLB News, Views, Stats, and Notes

October 22, 2021 Morning Edition: Red Sox News Roundup

This is your Red Sox Stats, News, Rumors, and Commentary Roundup for the Morning of October 22, 2021.

A Look at Red Sox Pitchers’ Velocity Metrics

Ryan Brasier

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 95.2 miles per hour. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Changeup because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. His Four Seam Fastball has an above average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is helpful in the art of pitching. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 86.1 miles per hour.

Garrett Whitlock

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 96.0 miles per hour. The difference between his average Four Seam Fastball and Changeup is 12.9, which is over 10 MPH and that is highly desired as the changeup is a more sudden change in velocity. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Curveball because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. He throws a softer slider than the average pitcher, his slider velocity is only 83.8 miles per hour.

Hirokazu Sawamura

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 96.1 miles per hour. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Changeup because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Curveball because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 86.4 miles per hour.

Chris Sale

His Fastball is below average in terms of velocity and he throws it on average 93.6 miles per hour. The lack of a meaningful change in velocities is a problem if Chris Sale wants to continue using a Changeup in his arsenal. The difference between his Fastball and Changeup is 6.9. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Curveball because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. He throws a softer slider than the average pitcher, his slider velocity is only 78.2 miles per hour.

Darwinzon Hernandez

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 94.9 miles per hour. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Changeup because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. His Four Seam Fastball has an above average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is helpful in the art of pitching. He throws a softer slider than the average pitcher, his slider velocity is only 83.5 miles per hour.

Josh Taylor

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 94.6 miles per hour. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Changeup because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. His Four Seam Fastball has a below average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is not very good as hitters looking for a Fastball could find a way to still make good timed contact with his Curveball given the lack of velocity difference. It is only a 14.4 MPH difference. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 87.3 miles per hour.

Tanner Houck

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 94.1 miles per hour. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Changeup because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Curveball because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. He throws a softer slider than the average pitcher, his slider velocity is only 84.4 miles per hour.

Nathan Eovaldi

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 96.9 miles per hour. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Changeup because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. His Four Seam Fastball has an above average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is helpful in the art of pitching. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 85.8 miles per hour.

Matt Barnes

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 95.9 miles per hour. The difference between his average Four Seam Fastball and Changeup in terms of velocity is 8.2. This is rather average for a MLB pitcher. His Four Seam Fastball has a below average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is not very good as hitters looking for a Fastball could find a way to still make good timed contact with his Curveball given the lack of velocity difference. It is only a 10.5 MPH difference. He does not feature a slider or he does not throw it enough to qualify.

Adam Ottavino

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 95.0 miles per hour. The lack of a meaningful change in velocities is a problem if Adam Ottavino wants to continue using a Changeup in his arsenal. The difference between his Fastball and Changeup is 6.9. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Curveball because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. He throws a softer slider than the average pitcher, his slider velocity is only 80.6 miles per hour.

Hansel Robles

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 96.8 miles per hour. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Changeup because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Curveball because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 90.2 miles per hour.

Nick Pivetta

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 94.8 miles per hour. The lack of a meaningful change in velocities is a problem if Nick Pivetta wants to continue using a Changeup in his arsenal. The difference between his Fastball and Changeup is 6.9. His Four Seam Fastball has an above average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is helpful in the art of pitching. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 86.0 miles per hour.

Martin Perez

His Fastball is below average in terms of velocity and he throws it on average 93.0 miles per hour. The difference between his average Four Seam Fastball and Changeup in terms of velocity is 8.2. This is rather average for a MLB pitcher. His Four Seam Fastball has a below average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is not very good as hitters looking for a Fastball could find a way to still make good timed contact with his Curveball given the lack of velocity difference. It is only a 14.2 MPH difference. He does not feature a slider or he does not throw it enough to qualify.

Eduardo Rodriguez

His Fastball is below average in terms of velocity and he throws it on average 92.6 miles per hour. The lack of a meaningful change in velocities is a problem if Eduardo Rodriguez wants to continue using a Changeup in his arsenal. The difference between his Fastball and Changeup is 7.2. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Curveball because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. He throws a softer slider than the average pitcher, his slider velocity is only 82.1 miles per hour.

Garrett Richards

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 94.4 miles per hour. The lack of a meaningful change in velocities is a problem if Garrett Richards wants to continue using a Changeup in his arsenal. The difference between his Fastball and Changeup is 3.8. His Four Seam Fastball has an above average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is helpful in the art of pitching. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 88.1 miles per hour.

Now onto the News, Rumors, and Commentary…

“The Red Sox have reinstated right-hander Phillips Valdez from the Covid-19-related injured list and cleared a spot on the roster by designating outfielder Franchy Cordero for assignment, per a club announcement. The team’s 40-man roster remains at 40 players. Cordero, 27, was one of several players acquired in the three-team swap that sent outfielder Andrew…”

Above is the summary of: Red Sox Designate Franchy Cordero For Assignment… tap or click to check out the full article.

“Much stranger things have happened, and they’ve happened to this Red Sox team specifically. The odds of Boston winning two in a row are low, but they are not zero. The Red Sox find themselves heading back to Houston this weekend with their backs against the proverbial walls, unable to afford a loss in either game to keep their season alive. So let’s put on our prediction hats and figure out who is the X-Factor for Boston this weekend.”

Above is the summary of: FanPost Friday: The key player for the weekend… tap or click to check out the full article.

“There’s a chance today is the last day on the schedule for the 2021 Red Sox. But there’s also a chance it’s not, and we’re sure as hell hoping for the latter scenario. Just got to win this one first. First pitch is set for 8:08 PM ET.”

Above is the summary of: OTM Open Thread 10/22: It is Friday… tap or click to check out the full article.

” Now, the Red Sox gear up for their latest pressurized situation in Game 6 of this ALCS, knowing a loss would spell the end of this wild season. We know what we’re capable of.” This team has been a wild roller-coaster ride, so why would it be any different now? The Red Sox surged through the early portion of the playoffs, beating the Yankees soundly in the AL Wild Card Game. The Red Sox had a chance to win Game 1 of the ALCS but squandered a 3-1 lead and lost, 5-4, creating urgency for Game 2 at Minute Maid Park the next day. The tone was set for the topsy-turvy nature of this season when the Red Sox opened 2021 by getting swept at Fenway by the eventual 110-loss Orioles.”

Above is the summary of: Sox in a must-win? Been there, done that… tap or click to check out the full article.

“After the Astros squeaked out a 5-4 win in Game 1, the Red Sox belted Houston around by a combined score of 21-8 in the next two games. Astros: Yuli Gurriel had three hits in the Astros’ Game 5 win and is riding a six-game hitting streak, dating back to Game 4 of the ALDS against the White Sox. The Astros’ final three runs in a five-run sixth in Game 5 came with two outs, as did their two in the ninth. The Red Sox, pushed to the brink, will try to push the series to two of everyone’s favorite words in sports: Game 7.”

Above is the summary of: Red Sox-Astros Game 6 FAQ (8 ET, FS1)… tap or click to check out the full article.

““I feel like this is what everybody wants to do,” Eovaldi said of pitching in an elimination game. With Tuesday originally scheduled as a bullpen day for the righty, Eovaldi doesn’t feel his 24 pitches in Game 4 will affect his Game 6 start. “I think having the two days in between definitely helps,” Eovaldi said on Thursday. There’s just something about when everything is on the line, and I think it brings the best out of us.” Eovaldi has made four appearances (three starts) in the postseason thus far.”

Above is the summary of: Eovaldi embraces latest win-or-go-home start… tap or click to check out the full article.



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