MLB News, Views, Stats, and Notes

October 22, 2021 Morning Edition: White Sox News Roundup

This is your White Sox Stats, News, Rumors, and Commentary Roundup for the Morning of October 22, 2021.

A Look at White Sox Pitchers’ Velocity Metrics

Craig Kimbrel

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 96.5 miles per hour. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Changeup because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. His Four Seam Fastball has a below average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is not very good as hitters looking for a Fastball could find a way to still make good timed contact with his Curveball given the lack of velocity difference. It is only a 10.4 MPH difference. He does not feature a slider or he does not throw it enough to qualify.

Carlos Rodon

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 95.4 miles per hour. The difference between his average Four Seam Fastball and Changeup is 10.1, which is over 10 MPH and that is highly desired as the changeup is a more sudden change in velocity. His Four Seam Fastball has an above average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is helpful in the art of pitching. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 85.8 miles per hour.

Ryan Burr

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 94.7 miles per hour. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Changeup because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Curveball because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. He throws a softer slider than the average pitcher, his slider velocity is only 78.0 miles per hour.

Liam Hendriks

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 97.7 miles per hour. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Changeup because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. His Four Seam Fastball has a below average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is not very good as hitters looking for a Fastball could find a way to still make good timed contact with his Curveball given the lack of velocity difference. It is only a 11.9 MPH difference. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 89.0 miles per hour.

Lance Lynn

His Fastball is below average in terms of velocity and he throws it on average 93.5 miles per hour. The lack of a meaningful change in velocities is a problem if Lance Lynn wants to continue using a Changeup in his arsenal. The difference between his Fastball and Changeup is 7.5. His Four Seam Fastball has a below average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is not very good as hitters looking for a Fastball could find a way to still make good timed contact with his Curveball given the lack of velocity difference. It is only a 11.3 MPH difference. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 88.6 miles per hour.

Ryan Tepera

His Fastball is below average in terms of velocity and he throws it on average 93.3 miles per hour. The difference between his average Four Seam Fastball and Changeup in terms of velocity is 9.3. This is rather average for a MLB pitcher. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Curveball because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. He throws a softer slider than the average pitcher, his slider velocity is only 80.8 miles per hour.

Garrett Crochet

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 96.7 miles per hour. The lack of a meaningful change in velocities is a problem if Garrett Crochet wants to continue using a Changeup in his arsenal. The difference between his Fastball and Changeup is 4.9. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Curveball because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 85.3 miles per hour.

Jose Ruiz

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 97.0 miles per hour. The lack of a meaningful change in velocities is a problem if Jose Ruiz wants to continue using a Changeup in his arsenal. The difference between his Fastball and Changeup is 7.6. His Four Seam Fastball has a below average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is not very good as hitters looking for a Fastball could find a way to still make good timed contact with his Curveball given the lack of velocity difference. It is only a 11.5 MPH difference. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 90.0 miles per hour.

Reynaldo Lopez

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 95.8 miles per hour. The difference between his average Four Seam Fastball and Changeup is 10.1, which is over 10 MPH and that is highly desired as the changeup is a more sudden change in velocity. His Four Seam Fastball has an above average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is helpful in the art of pitching. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 86.7 miles per hour.

Michael Kopech

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 97.4 miles per hour. The lack of a meaningful change in velocities is a problem if Michael Kopech wants to continue using a Changeup in his arsenal. The difference between his Fastball and Changeup is 7.6. His Four Seam Fastball has an above average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is helpful in the art of pitching. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 84.5 miles per hour.

Aaron Bummer

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 95.4 miles per hour. The lack of a meaningful change in velocities is a problem if Aaron Bummer wants to continue using a Changeup in his arsenal. The difference between his Fastball and Changeup is 7.1. We are not able to compare his Four Seam Fastball to his Curveball because he does not feature both pitches in his repertoire. He throws a softer slider than the average pitcher, his slider velocity is only 83.0 miles per hour.

Lucas Giolito

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 93.9 miles per hour. The difference between his average Four Seam Fastball and Changeup is 12.3, which is over 10 MPH and that is highly desired as the changeup is a more sudden change in velocity. His Four Seam Fastball has a below average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is not very good as hitters looking for a Fastball could find a way to still make good timed contact with his Curveball given the lack of velocity difference. It is only a 13.2 MPH difference. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 85.7 miles per hour.

Dylan Cease

He throws an above-average Fastball in velocity and he throws it on average 96.7 miles per hour. The difference between his average Four Seam Fastball and Changeup is 18.5, which is over 10 MPH and that is highly desired as the changeup is a more sudden change in velocity. His Four Seam Fastball has an above average velocity difference from his Curveball, which is helpful in the art of pitching. He features a slider that generates above-average velocity on average, which is 86.0 miles per hour.

Now onto the News, Rumors, and Commentary…

“The White Sox didn’t give up much for Hernandez so they didn’t necessarily lose the trade but Hernandez wasn’t as good with them as he was with Cleveland leading up to it. During the offseason, the White Sox would be smarter to find an upgrade over both Madrigal and Hernandez. The Chicago White Sox has some holes to fill this winter and some things to adjust. The Chicago White Sox needs to make some changes to their roster before 2022.”

Above is the summary of: Chicago White Sox: Second base can certainly be upgraded… tap or click to check out the full article.

“As other teams mosey on through the playoffs, the White Sox head into the silly season of speculation on matters small and large, and SSS duty geezer Leigh Allan and his son and west coast corespondent, Will, take a look at some of it. There are a few chuckles along the way, because most of the speculation is downright nutty — though they do agree if you want to pretend you can trade a guy who can’t function unless it’s the ninth inning and your team has a one- to three-run lead and it’s between 68 and 76 degrees and the wind is blowing in from right center at 8-15 mph with his $16 million contract for anything useful, you might as well decide you’ll get Mike Trout. Why, let’s get Corey Seager to go with Trout! Need a backup catcher who can actually, oh, maybe, catch (unlike even our first-string catcher, whose framing has fallen to mediocre at best, and has never been much good at that blocking or throwing stuff)? Buster Posey seems a natural! Then there are more serious possibilities, such as whether Carlos Rodón should, or will, accept a qualifying offer (Will says yes, Leigh says no — Scott Boras knows the answer). That’s the fate of White Sox fans.”

Above is the summary of: Sharing Sox Podcast 58: Waddya Gimme for a Used Closer Edition… tap or click to check out the full article.

“Box score link Yoelqui Céspedes hit second today, and José Rodríguez held down the 8-spot over four at-bats, as the Glendale Desert Dogs emerged victorious over the Scottsdale Scorpions, 10-5. (There is some wackiness in the box score with Rodríguez apparently erroneously designated as being substituted out in the sixth; he had two more at-bats after that, his ninth-inning strikeout notated as a pinch-hit appearance.) Céspedes’ two hits brought his average up about 50 points to .217 (six games), and Rodríguez’s .125 night dropped his to .238 over the same span. The latter’s strikeout tonight was only his second overall. Céspedes went 2-for-5, an infield single and run scored in the first and a line drive in the fifth, and Rodríguez was 1-for-5 with a two-RBI single as part of a four-run seventh inning.”

Above is the summary of: White Sox Minor League Update: October 21, 2021… tap or click to check out the full article.



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